Leora Tanenbaum

OP-EDS & BLOG POSTS
BOOKS
I Am Not a Slutt offers both a wake-up call about the dangerous impact of the word ‘slut’ and a path forward to talk about sex and sexuality in an open, positive, and nonjudgmental way.” -Cecile Richards, president of Planned Parenthood Federation of America
"The woman who exposed slut-bashing, cat-fighting, and God-reclaiming takes on women's masochistic relationship with their feet. Run (while you still can) to your nearest bookstore and save your sole." - Jennifer Baumgardner, author of Look Both Ways and Manifesta
"The most comprehensive overview of the status of women and religion I've read. It chronicles the harm religion can do to both men and women, but also holds out a promise of radiant hope."
--Frank Schaeffer, author of Crazy for God
“Incisive exploration of a long-taboo subject--how and why women sabotage one another.”
--Gail Sheehy
“An eye-opening book.”
--Redbook

Slut-Shaming & the Presidential Candidates

The Huffington Post, October 28, 2016

We are at a pivotal moment in public conversation about the sexual objectification of women. The claim that feminists have been making for decades—that grabbing or kissing someone without consent constitutes sexual assault—is finally understood and acknowledged.

This can also be a watershed moment in recognizing the mindset that creates the foundation for assault: slut-shaming. Looking at Hillary Clinton’s past in addition to Donald Trump’s helps us understand how far we have come.

Back in the 1990s, Hillary Clinton engaged in slut-shaming: she denigrated the credibility of women who claimed they had been sexually involved with or abused by her husband, Bill Clinton. Hillary Clinton’s supporters should address this piece of her history head-on instead of burying it. Betsey Wright, then a close adviser to the Clintons, told The New York Times earlier this month that discussing this history is “dredging up irrelevant slime from the past.” But acknowledging Clinton’s tactics from over two decades ago and putting them in cultural context is necessary to show how much Clinton—and awareness about slut-shaming—has grown....

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